Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Five Things To Remember On Sept. 30

1. October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. The bishops have said domestic violence has no place in relationships, there's a way to recognize it and to help.

2. In a letter to the National Security Council, USCCB International Justice and Peace Chairman Bishop Richard E. Pates and Dr. Carolyn Woo, President of Catholic Relief Services, welcome the expanded response to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

3. Did you see Pope Francis and Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI together this past weekend?

4. Respect Life Month also begins tomorrow and you can find many resources for life issues at USCCB.org.


5. God loves you.

Monday, September 29, 2014

Five Things To Remember On Sept. 29



1. Respect Life Month begins Wednesday. In the Respect Life Statement, Cardinal Sean O'Malley said, "Our mission is to show each person the love of Christ. As uniquely created individuals, we each have unique gifts which we are called to use to share Christ’s love. We are continually given opportunities to do so in our interactions with the cashier at the grocery store, our spouses, children, friends and even the people we encounter in traffic. Each of these moments is valuable beyond our realization. We may never know how much a simple gesture of compassion may affect someone’s life."

2. Bishop William Callahan, OFM Conv., of the Diocese of La Crosse talks about living the vows of a consecrated life--poverty, chastity and obedience.

3. The USCCB will host a media conference Oct. 1 at 10 a.m. for the kickoff of the Year of Consecrated Life. Representatives from the three national coalitions of religious orders, will present a set of initiatives that focus on bringing together consecrated religious men and women and families, particularly young adults.Watch it live.

4. Catholic News Service reports, "Pope Francis warned against the abandonment and neglect of the elderly, calling it a 'hidden euthanasia' rooted in today's 'poisonous' culture of disposal and an economic system of greed."

5. God loves you.

Friday, September 26, 2014

Five Things To Remember On Sept. 26


1. Have you installed the new Catholic News Service mobile app on your iOS or Android device? Use the app today for your chance to win The Simple Wisdom of Pope Francis collection. We'll select 20 winners at random on September 29th and you could be one of them!

2. In a letter to the National Security Council, USCCB International Justice and Peace Chairman Bishop Richard E. Pates and Dr. Carolyn Woo, President of Catholic Relief Services, welcome the expanded response to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

3. Father John Crossin is now on Twitter, sharing thoughts on ecumenical outreach in the Catholic Church.

4. Bishop William Callahan, OFM Conv., of the Diocese of La Crosse talks about living the vows of a consecrated life--poverty, chastity and obedience.




5. God loves you.

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Five Things To Remember On Sept. 24


1. Speaking at the United Nations, the Vatican's Secretary of State said Climate Change is a man-made issue that demands responsibility and action.

2. Baseball's postseason is next month, but Pope Francis got in the action a little early Wednesday.

3. October is National Respect Life Month. Find out why the Church protects life in all its stages.


4. Also, National Vocational Awareness Week is November 2-8

5. God loves you.

Friday, September 19, 2014

Five Things To Remember On Sept. 19



1. This weekend brings Catechetical Sunday, which will focus on the theme "Teaching About God's Gift of Forgiveness."

2. Catholic News Service says bishops are returning to the U.S. "after a nine-day pilgrimage to the Holy Land with a stronger resolve to advocate for peace and to urge the U.S. government to take a leadership role in ushering Israelis and Palestinians toward peace."

3. Pope Francis said the economy and social order must serve the human person.

4. Are you following Marriage: Unique for a Reason and For Your Marriage on Facebook?

5. God loves you.

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Protect the Internet for what it is: essential to the common good



By Bishop John C. Wester 

Increasingly, Americans now use the Internet for almost every aspect of their lives, and that means more than only downloading videos to entertain. We use the Internet to find employment; get, share and create news; take care of our health; take part in formal education and sate our curiosity about many things outside of formal education; engage in political activity and interact with our governments; organize ourselves and band together for support and fellowship, and even seek spiritual insights and support of our faith.

It is almost impossible for anyone who is trying to improve her life or to contribute to her community, to do so without access to the Internet. Knowledge is power, and for the marginalized, denial of Internet service often means being made even more powerless.

The Pew Research Internet Project reports that 87 percent of Americans use the Internet, with near saturation usage among those living in households earning $75,000 or more, young adults ages 18-29, and the college-educated. While our workplace usage hasn’t changed significantly in the past 15 years (44 to 41 percent), digital activity outside of the workplace has become almost universal.

With that in mind, it seems clear that access to the Internet is as essential and necessary for Americans as is access to education, news and other services that allow us to flourish and make positive contributions to society.

The Federal Communication Commission’s recent interest in creating a “two-tiered” Internet will impair for many Americans this basic need – fast, reliable access to all Internet content. Instead of adopting rules that permit the wealthiest companies to purchase the best service, the FCC should insist on fair treatment for everyone no matter our income.

Community-serving organizations – such as the church – should not be treated as secondary “customers” in this digital environment. The content and connections we provide to people are more important than entertainment content -- such as movies and television shows -- even though we don’t have the resources to compete with entertainment companies to pay more to the Internet providers.
 Nonprofits rely on the Internet to strengthen their human networks. They use digital platforms to raise money, to mobilize advocacy work, to alert people of dangerous situations, to connect loved ones, to educate children and adults and to provide charitable and humanitarian aid.

Allowing some Internet content to be favored because of its greater ability to pay could result in an even greater divide between the powerful and the rest of a community. Under that scenario, decisions regarding access to public information, the ability to organize, and other first amendment rights, would be determined based only on the bottom line of corporations, not to promote the common good.

The World Wide Web is an international treasure of information, creativity and human potential. It should be preserved and protected by regulation as a place that fosters the best in humankind. The FCC needs a better vision of what the Internet is and what it can do.

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Bishop John Wester is chair of the US Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on Communications and bishop of the Salt Lake City Diocese.